Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) Personality Types & Career Selection

Choosing the right career path for an individual can be a tricky situation. Most career opportunities are better suited for people with a certain kind of personality, and hence, to gauge these unique personas Isabel Briggs Myers created the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) with her mother, Katharine Cook Briggs during the 1940’s.

The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator has been a highly effective way of identifying what kind of personality an individual possesses, and what sort of position they would be best suited for. Its basic purpose is to pin down how certain people perceive the environment around them and make decisions accordingly based on their psychological preferences.

Using introspective questions across four different dichotomies, the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator can classify an individual into one of 16 different personality types. The four dichotomies work to assign a characteristic to whoever is taking the test, and are explained as follows:

 

INTROVERT (I) OR EXTROVERT (E) – this characteristic identifies whether you derive your energy from either the people around you, or from spending time with yourself.

SENSING (S) OR INTUITIVE (N) – these functions determine how you gather information of things; you either operate on specific facts and concrete details, or prefer to focus more on your natural intuition to carry out actions.

THINKING (T) OR FEELING (F) – determining your decision-making functions, you would either classify as someone who uses logical analysis and principles, or as a person working towards harmony between all agents involved and considering values.

JUDGING (J) OR PERCEIVING (P) – this preference highlights the level of complexity you are comfortable with; judging types prefer organized and structured environments, while perceiving types are in their element when their surroundings allow for flexibility, learning, and creativity.

 

Using characteristics from these major dichotomies, a total of 16 personality archetypes can be divided further into four major categories:

The Analysts

THE ARCHITECT (INTJ) – Imaginative and strategic thinkers, always ready with a plan for everything. These people are perfect as Corporate Strategists, Organization Builders & Business Administrator.

THE LOGICIAN (INTP) – Innovative inventors with an unquenchable thirst for knowledge. These people work well as Computer Programmers, Systems Analysts & Photographers.

THE COMMANDER (ENTJ) – They are bold, imaginative, and strong-willed leaders, always working to either find a way, or make one. Such people are best suited for careers as Business Executives, Computer Consultants & Managers.

THE DEBATER (ENTP) – Smart and curious thinkers who cannot resist an intellectual challenge. Work well as Attorneys, Marketing Representatives & Psychologists.

 

The Diplomats

THE ADVOCATE (INFJ) – Quiet and mystical, yet very inspiring and tireless idealists. Possible career choices include Teachers, Counselors & Medical Doctors.

THE MEDIATOR (INFP) – Poetic, kind and altruistic people, always eager to help a good cause. These people prove to be great as Writers, Psychiatrists & Social Workers.

THE PROTAGONIST (ENFJ) – Such individuals are charismatic and inspiring leaders, able to mesmerize their listeners. Careers as Sales Representatives, Human Resource Managers & Diplomats are well-suited for such individuals.

THE CAMPAIGNER (ENFP) – Enthusiastic, creative and sociable free spirits, who can always find a reason to smile. Excel as Journalists, Politicians & Artists.

 

The Sentinels

THE LOGISTICIAN (ISTJ) – Practical and fact-minded individuals, whose reliability cannot be doubted. Financial Officers, Accountants & Military Leaders are usually found to be this type.

THE DEFENDER (ISFJ) – Very dedicated and warm protectors, always ready to defend their loved ones. Careers as Nurses, Firefighters & Paralegals are preferred for them.

THE EXECUTIVE (ESTJ) – These people serve as excellent administrators, unsurpassed at managing things – or people. Work great as Contractors, Stock Brokers & Corporate Trainers.

THE CONSUL (ESFJ) – Extraordinarily caring, social and popular people, always eager to help. Such individuals shine as Art Teachers, Flight Attendants & Graphic Designers.

 

The Explorers

THE VIRTUOSO (ISTP) – Bold and practical experimenters, masters of all kinds of tools. Computer Specialists, Investment Bankers & Cooks are smart career choices for such individuals.

THE ADVENTURER (ISFP) – Flexible and charming artists, always ready to explore and experience something new. Suitable careers include Travel Salespersons, Marine Biologists & Customer Support Representatives.

THE ENTREPRENEUR (ESTP) – Smart, energetic and very perceptive people, who truly enjoy living on the edge. Stockbrokers, Aeronautical Engineers & Film Producers can be promising career choices.

THE ENTERTAINER (ESFP) – Spontaneous, energetic and enthusiastic people – life is never boring around them. These people are best suited as Actors, Marketing Specialists & Editors.

 

Although, classifying the population under certain universal characteristics seems like a difficult job, the MBTI has proven to be quite effective in the way that it factors in the smallest of variations in behavior as a part of the equation. This personality division has greatly helped the corporate world in how employers can now make sure that the person they are hiring is in fact, right for the job. It also helps individuals to ascertain the best possible career paths for themselves that fall in line with their personality type.

The MBTI Personality Test is widely available on the internet and, though it is helpful to consult a specialist, individuals can also take the quiz by themselves and read in depth about the nature of their disposition to best help them choose a profession they are meant to excel at.

You can find a copy of the quiz by clicking on the link below:

https://www.16personalities.com/free-personality-test

nosherwan.khan@rozee.pk'

About Nosherwan Khan

Share:Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*